People with immunodeficiency should be reminded: CECC

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  • By Yang Yuan-ting and Jake Chung / Journalist, with editor-in-chief

People aged 12 or older with low immunity are eligible for COVID-19 booster shots at least 28 days after their second dose, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) said yesterday.

Those with low immunity induced by congenital or chronic disease should be given a booster dose to be properly protected against COVID-19, said Chiu Nan-chang (邱南昌), doctor in the pediatric infections division at Mackay Memorial Hospital, during a CECC press conference.

Eligible are people living with cancer or HIV, those who are currently or in the last year undergoing immunotherapy, those who are currently or in the past six months undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy, those who have recently received a transplant. organ or stem cells, those with moderate to severe congenital immunity, those undergoing hemodialysis, those taking high-strength immunosuppressive drugs, and those with diagnosed immunity, he said.

Photo courtesy of the Central Epidemic Command Center

Chiu said there are two types of boosters: top-up boosters that should only be given five months after the second dose and boosters to increase baseline protection that can be given within 28 days of the second dose.

Taiwan would administer half-doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine as additional boosters to those who received the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine as the first and second doses, he said, adding that the boosters to increase baseline protection would be full doses of Moderna. .

While all common vaccine brands offer protection against the virus, AstraZeneca would not be used in the booster program because it does not offer much additional protection, Chiu said.

The CECC is prioritizing the Medigen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines, Chiu said.

Those who have had bad experiences with any of the booster brands might ask their doctors for some basic AstraZeneca protection boosters, he added.

Meanwhile, the CECC said yesterday that four previously reported COVID-19 cases in travelers involved the Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2.

Taiwan reported its first Omicron case on December 11. Cases confirmed yesterday brought Taiwan’s total to 16.

These are all imported cases that tested positive for COVID-19 either upon entering Taiwan or during quarantine, CECC data showed.

Separately, the Department of National Defense said those entering military bases should from Saturday next week show proof of full vaccination against COVID-19.

Those who are not fully vaccinated are expected to test negative for the COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction test within a week of entering service and undergo rapid drug tests every week, the ministry said.

The CECC said yesterday that four previously reported cases of COVID-19 involved the Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2.

Taiwan reported its first Omicron case on December 11. Cases confirmed yesterday brought Taiwan’s total to 16.

These are all imported cases that tested positive for COVID-19 either upon entering Taiwan or during quarantine, CECC data showed.

CNA Supplementary Reports

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